Excerpts from “Maiden In Light” (Part 1)

From the beginning of the first chapter:
____________________________

Were there such creatures as the Faerye?

Ambris, called Just, was a gentle soul who would have paused to notice the first spring flowers at the roadside or a glorious sunset or the sparkles of dew on a spider’s web—but he did not believe. Occupied by his business in the bustling port of New York, he had no time to dwell upon such fanciful ideas. Yet, this day, he must hesitate and wonder.

A carriage accident draws attention, especially within town walls: the splintering crackle of a broken wheel, the crash, the spew of dust, the horse squeals and human cries. The coach had barely cleared the gates of the Dolphin Inn stable yard, closed from the market square by a tall wooden wall tacked with advertising banners and official proclamations, when one of the forewheels collapsed, its spokes snapped, and one side of the carriage suddenly sagged low. A crowd gathered swiftly about the small disaster, laughing, shouting hearty jests and advice to the coachman in his precarious seat above, offering useless encouragements to the woman shut within. A cheer rose as the axle snapped under the weight of the sagging coach and the entire front end landed with a thud. The woman within howled her outrage. The spectators hooted.

Ambris watched the riotous scene with distaste; it was not his idea of sport. New York was not his home, but he was a nobleman and therefore obliged by long-standing tradition to aid any maid or child or commoner, subject or no, whom he found in distress. Duty compelled him.
Continue reading “Excerpts from “Maiden In Light” (Part 1)”

aethercowboy’s review of The Wizard’s Son

“To put it bluntly: this book was surprisingly good. It wasn’t GREAT, but it was still good. Set in an alternate history, between the 1930s and 1950s, we are introduced to the child Orlan, recently orphaned, or so he thinks, until he meets his long-lost Wizard dad. And not just any wizard! This guy’s the top wizard. Orlan lives with him and becomes his apprentice, but feels that he is not fit for wizardry, as it is a cruel life devoid of human emotions and sympathies, full of war and aggression, and all that rot. So he rebels. While the story could be considered fantasy, magic plays a very small role in this book. It reads more like a coming of age, or a Bildungsroman, than it does a book about wizards.”
The Wizard’s Son by Kathryn L. Ramage, by aethercowboy, Jacob’s Conjoined Feed, October 21, 2010 (use Ctrl A to see the text)

Amazon Review

“In the world of wizardry, the sins of the father are weighed heavily against the son. “The Wizard’s Son” is the story of Orlan Lightesblood, a son of one of the most powerful wizards in the world. But being born under a wizard is no easy task, as the training that lies ahead of him seems to be a drop in the barrel for the enemies he will inherit. “The Wizard’s Son” is an exciting fantasy, highly recommended.”
Midwest Book Review at Amazon.com

Maiden in Light

The sequel to The Wizard’s Son is expected out in May 2011.

From the back-cover blurb:

“From the top of the gate, Alys smiled down. There was no evidence of evil, yet Laurel felt it. That absence of living energy concealed something grotesque. She shuddered when she met those night eyes, repulsed as she might be by a dead mouse accidentally trod underfoot or a cold, scaly water-thing brushing against her body in a stream. Her nerves thrilled with danger. She’d seen this girl before, watching and smiling secretly. She’d sensed this presence months ago, though she hadn’t understood until now what it was. This was why she had come to New York…”

To see the cover and read the rest of the blurb, go to the sister Web site: http://www.minl.wapshottpress.com.

Maiden in Light cover


Click on image for larger version

Back cover verbiage:

“From the top of the gate, Alys smiled down. There was no evidence of evil, yet Laurel felt it. That absence of living energy concealed something grotesque. She shuddered when she met those night eyes, repulsed as she might be by a dead mouse accidentally trod underfoot or a cold, scaly water-thing brushing against her body in a stream. Her nerves thrilled with danger. She’d seen this girl before, watching and smiling secretly. She’d sensed this presence months ago, though she hadn’t understood until now what it was. This was why she had come to New York…”

When Laurel Windswift enters an apprenticeship under her uncle, the great wizard Lord Redmantyl, she sees only the delights that her magic can bring. But her desire for more knowledge brings her too soon into the dark secrets that all magicians of power share, and forces her to take up a wizard’s duties of night vigils against monstrous and inhuman forces before she is ready. When Laurel returns to her home city to investigate a small magical anomaly for her uncle, this maiden of light meets a child of darkness, and must undertake a task too terrible to perform.

On an alternate earth filled with wonder and danger, the wizard’s niece must make a decision that will affect the rest of her life. As she struggles with the unbearable obligations of a magician, she also faces the ostracism of the merchant families who cast her out as a child, her aunt’s matchmaking efforts, and finding an unexpected love.

Another Author Interview

How long did it take to write the book?

“About two years initially, then a few more months for rewrites. The story was originally all in chronological order, but in an effort to shorten it and get to the focus of the plot more quickly, I moved a lot of scenes involving Orlan’s childhood to later sections of the story and made them flashbacks.”

September 1, 2010: Kathryn L. Ramage interview on the Indie Spotlight.

Author Interview

What inspired you to write this book?

“I began working on this novel in grad school, when I was taking courses in Old English and medieval lit. In my first versions of the story, I used a lot of proper names and other words that were a sort of amalgamation of Old or Middle English and medieval French, as if the two countries and their languages had never become separate; the Norman Empire contains both. A lot of that has been edited out since to make the story easier to read, although I’ve tried to keep just a little taste of it in some of the names.”
August 30, 2010: Interview with Kathryn L. Ramage on SellingBooks.com.

The Wizard’s Son Reviews

So far:

July 20, 2010: The Wizard’s Son review at GoodReads.com by Linda Robinson

June 13, 2010: The Wizard’s Son reviewed at GoodReads.com by Catrina

May 25, 2010: The Wizard Son is reviewed at Amazon by Loucypher Justin

May 20, 2010: The Wizard’s Son reviewed at Young Adult Books Central by J. Mitchell

May 15, 2010: The Wizard Son is reviewed at Amazon by Johnathan Gladen

April 12, 2010: The Wizard’s Son Fantasy and Sci Fi Reviews
(Note: the Amazon reviews for 12-April-2010 are the same)

April 12, 2010: The Wizard’s Son Amazon US (all Amazon reviews)

April 12, 2010: The Wizard’s Son Amazon UK

February 18, 2010: The Wizard’s Son Amazon Review (all Amazon US reviews)

December 31, 2009: The Wizard’s Son Amazon Review (all Amazon US reviews)